What are scissors

shear

importance

cut sth. very short with a cutting tool
especially hair just above the skin
getting the hair shorn
keep your hair cropped short
to shave one's beard
the head bald, shear a bald head (= cut off all hair)
with (short, bald) shaved head
Shear the lawn, the grass
Shear carpets, cloths, velvet
a shorn lawn
⟨Jmdn.scheren⟩jmds. Cut (bald) hair on the head
to shear so. (with a razor)
"Shear an animal" shear the fur of an animal
shear the wool from the sheep
My grandfather sheared his sheep himself [↗FrischNow they are singing again5]
All around the tractors have sheared the fields (= mowed) [↗StrittmatterTinko370]
⟨Is flock, sheep, shear his wool⟩ know how to skillfully perceive his business, financial advantage
everyone hopes that he will shear his sheep before the gate closes [↗Weerth2,431]
colloquial, transferred⟨jmdn. to scheren⟩jmdn (about sth.) to cheat (of sth.)
liken everyone (= measure all with the same yardstick, treat them indiscriminately)
Borkhausen had just shorn her by two thousand five hundred [↗FalladaEveryone dies269]
cut a tree, cut a hedge, prune
the old house with the square-cut linden tree [↗StormPole Poppensp.4,41]
shear

etymology

shear1 · Unscathed · trouble
shear1 Vb ‘Cut bald (a surface), shave, cut off a bit’. The strong verb ahd.skeran 'cut, shear' (8th century), mhd.schern '(cut off), shear, determine the monk by shearing the tonsure, harvest, harass, torture, divide, organize', mnd. schēren, mnl.scēren 'scrape, scratch, scissors', nl.scheren, aengl.sceran, to shear 'to shear, cut off, mow', arrangement.skera 'cut, slaughter', Swedish skära has a ( in the Nhd. not preserved) weak verb ahd.skerren 'classify, let in, limit' (around 800), mhd.schern '(divide), where to create, separate, exclude, allocate', asächs.skerian 'allocate, divide ', mnd.schēren, mnl.scēren' allocate ', aengl.scearian' allocate, determine '. Semantically, the weak verb is closely related to the ↗Schar1 (s. d.) treated noun forms and is to be understood as a denominative. Exceptionally. are related to aind.kṛṇā́ti 'injured, kills', utkīrṇa 'cut out, scratched', Greek ké͞irein (κείρειν) 'cut off, shear', lit.skìrti 'separate, divide, separate, allocate', Latin caro 'meat', actually 'piece (meat)' as well as air.scar (a) in 'trenne'. A common and often expanded root ie. * (S) ker (ə) - cut ’can be opened up. This includes expressions like (not) to care about sth. ‘To (not) take care of sth.’ (17th century), today mostly weakly inflected (under the influence of ↗scheren2?, s. d.), probably going back to the meaning of mhd.schern ‘bother, torment’ (see above); (everything) to lump together ‘measure with the same measure, treat in the same way’ (16th century); shear his sheep ‘take advantage of it’ (18th century). unscathed Part.adj. (stay or leave) ‘unmolested, unmolested’, ahd.ungiscoran (10th century), mhd.uneschorn. Trouble for 'discomfort' (18th century).

Typical connections to ›scissors‹

Automatically selected from the DWDS corpora

Usage examples for ›scissors‹

Automatically selected from the DWDS corpora

If you wanted, you could shave your beard or have your hair cut to a fashionable length.
Fresenius, Hanna: Sauna, Reinbek near Hamburg: Rowohlt 1987 [1974], p. 18
Her hair is shaved so bald as if she wanted to punish herself.
But the baron has found the descendants of the unfortunate hairdresser who at the time had taken credit for shaving the woman.
Schulze, Ingo: Neue Leben, Berlin: Berlin Verlag 2005, p. 360
Nineteen years old, narrow-minded and cunning, he was shaved bald and did not smell his breath.
Thelen, Albert Vigoleis: The island of the second face, Düsseldorf: Claassen 1981 [1953], p. 209
The Turkmen carpets seem to be best sheared to the author.
Oriental Archives, 1913, No. 2, Vol. 3

Errors in usage examples to "shear"

Citation aid
“Scheren”, provided by the digital dictionary of the German language, , accessed on May 21, 2021.

Additional Information …

Grammar verb shears, sheared, Hassheared
Subsidiary form raised, obsoleteshear Verb sheer, sheared, Hassheared
Pronunciation [ˈʃeːʀən]

Meanings

⟨Etw., Sb.schertjmdn.⟩etw., Sb. Is indifferent to sb., Cares, does not bother sb
Grammar: only negative or questioning
he cared little what became of her
sloppy, you don't give a damn (= that's none of your business)
But as a real carpenter he didn't care about the chips [↗BronnenDeutschland134]
But what did we care tomorrow?
She doesn't care about me, should do what she likes [↗SternheimHoseIV 3]
What do I care woman, what do I care child! [[HeineGrenadiere1,40]
casually, coarse, they both didn't give a damn about a lacquered devil if he later climbed onto his skipper's roof [↗A. BranchEducation323]
Colloquially to deal with sth., to shear sb. to take care of sth., to deal with sth., to deal with sb
we didn't care about the ban
casual has one, the devil cared about the traffic signs
casually, don't give a damn (= not at all) about sth., give sb
I don't care much about what people think of me after my death [↗Feuchtw.Tag121]
she will not care too much about a cripple [↗Feuchtw.Goya506]
shear

etymology

shear1 · Unscathed · trouble
shear1 Vb ‘Cut bald (a surface), shave, cut off a bit’. The strong verb ahd.skeran 'cut, shear' (8th century), mhd.schern '(cut off), shear, determine the monk by shearing the tonsure, harvest, harass, torment, divide, organize', mnd. schēren, mnl.scēren 'scrape, scratch, scissors', nl.scheren, aengl.sceran, to shear 'to shear, cut off, mow', arrangement.skera 'cut, slaughter', Swedish skära has a ( in the Nhd. not preserved) weak verb ahd.skerren 'classify, let in, limit' (around 800), mhd.schern '(divide), where to create, separate, exclude, allocate', asächs.skerian 'allocate, divide ', mnd.schēren, mnl.scēren' allocate ', aengl.scearian' allocate, determine '. Semantically, the weak verb is closely related to the ↗Schar1 (s. d.) treated noun forms and is to be understood as a denominative. Exceptionally. are related to aind.kṛṇā́ti 'injured, kills', utkīrṇa 'cut out, scratched', Greek ké͞irein (κείρειν) 'cut off, shear', lit.skìrti 'separate, divide, separate, allocate', Latin caro 'meat', actually 'piece (meat)' as well as air.scar (a) in 'trenne'. A common and often expanded root ie. * (S) ker (ə) - cut ’can be opened up. This is where phrases like (not) to care about sth. ‘To (not) take care of sth.’ (17th century), today mostly weakly inflected (under the influence of scheren2?, s. d.), probably going back to the meaning of mhd.schern ‘bother, torment’ (see above); (everything) to lump together ‘measure with the same measure, treat in the same way’ (16th century); Shear his sheep ‘take advantage of it’ (18th century). unscathed Part.adj. (stay or leave) ‘unmolested, unmolested’, ahd.ungiscoran (10th century), mhd.uneschorn. Trouble for 'discomfort' (18th century).

Typical connections to ›scissors‹

Automatically selected from the DWDS corpora