Which is stronger karata or kung fu

Securitytreff.de is for sale. If you are interested, please send an email to [email protected]
  • Karate or Kung Fu? Which is better for securities? 9

    1. both not suitable (7) 78%

    I was thinking of starting martial arts again soon. However, is it difficult for me to choose between karate and kung fu? What do you all mean? What is more suitable for the security industry?

    "Better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not."
    Niklas Severin Faber (1985-2001)

    "Anyway, I'm barely able to say anything intelligent ..."
    Jack Nicholson

  • Bush lean with only two options, right?
    It would be like buying a new car and just asking about Dacia and Lada.

    Each martial art has advantages and disadvantages. I would advise thinking outside the box and also consider other "sports".

  • In my opinion, everything that works in a small space and, in addition to punching and kicking techniques, levers, etc. is suitable for the service. includes.
    There are various things and it just has to "lie" for the user.

    Otherwise, I'll join the fox ...

    Morning hour has lead in the knee ...

  • Hi,

    in karate and kung fu you often have space-consuming techniques.

    This is more of a disadvantage in our work.

    In close combat you have little space ... and ... it must not always be or become effective in public when you issue a physical reprimand.

    Techniques from the "Systema" area are more suitable - working with the Kubotan stick is also quite effective.

    When things get down to business, it has to be right - in other words ... be effective.

    I don't want to perform a courtship or mating ritual with my counterpart.

    Here I prefer Real Defense Fighting. A good trainer for this: Christian Bengs - Safety Consulting Bengs in Bremen. He doesn't just drool - he can do something too (painful memories are just returning )

    Very beneficial: Anatomical knowledge: Where can I inflict pain with little force - where is it dangerous !!! ??? !!! (Keyword: irritation of the vagus nerve up to reflex cardiac arrest, etc.)

    ... and always remember: sanding - applying - polishing - sanding - applying - polishing: wink:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7_dzu4TQDs&feature=related

    once work with professionals ...


  • in karate and kung fu you often have space-consuming techniques.

    Unfortunately I have to contradict you a little
    Wing Tsun - without wishing to advertise it now - is also a Kung Fu style ... and it is not without reason that many special units teach it.
    Very dynamic, little to no space-consuming techniques ...

    But Systema, Krav Maga and RSF are also quite suitable!

    Morning hour has lead in the knee ...

  • Moin Peer,

    I agree with you - especially in the area of ​​WT.

    I was also thinking more of the traditional Shotokan karate ...

    once work with professionals ...

  • Unfortunately I have to contradict you a little
    Wing Tsun - without wanting to advertise it now - is also a Kung Fu style ... and it is not without reason that it is taught by many special units.
    Very dynamic, little to no space-consuming techniques ...

    ... + a few basics from boxing and wrestling a very effective story.

    I'm just about to make friends with MMA, because the fun factor is really very high ...

    Try a few things and find the best for yourself.

  • ... + a few basics from boxing and wrestling a very effective story.

    : wink:

    Morning hour has lead in the knee ...

  • This is probably the best basis for successful training ... it has to suit you and it has to be fun!

    once work with professionals ...

  • For practical self-defense, I would steer a long way to classic martial arts. Things that are relaxed and free like Non-Classical Gung Fu or Progressive Fighting Systems (JKD) take a more direct route to what you actually want to learn.
    If this is not available regionally, I would suggest Thai boxing, kick boxing - learn some lever techniques from a good Jiu-Jitsu or Aikido instructor. Preferably two good lever techniques, done. I trained (among other things) Jiu-Jitsu and Aikido myself. Nevertheless, in practice - e.g. as a bouncer - I almost only used two different techniques to hold on or to lead. One was a lever technique that I was shown during a trial training session with an old police instructor. The technology worked immediately, after that it was just a matter of finding different entrances ... 95% of all "clients" found their way to the door in the lever.

    I also trained karate for several years. Problem: The nature of the workout makes you get used to stopping the punches. So everywhere at least 2 options - stop or hit through. In addition, there are a lot of different defense techniques at different attack angles. The more choices you have, the slower you react. In boxing, Thai boxing, PFS, in other non-classic fighting techniques, this is rationalized down to a minimum and there is extensive work with protective equipment and hand targets (claws, Thai pads). You can always hit it hard.

    That gives you self-confidence, motivates and is more fun. It should be fun too - you will spend a lot of time doing it.

  • The posting was now really ne corpse desecration ....

    It was allowed to rest for almost two years and just started to indulge itself comfortably to the corruption ... uh to the data nirvana and then came Sean: mrgreen:

  • I thought it was just a shame that such an old thread was so high up.

    Since it is a question that is asked again and again with the same wording in different forums, a small preserved text can sometimes liven up the forum. But now you've exposed me and my trick has been exposed.

  • Did you succeed ............... :-)

    "Nothing works where we are ......... but we can't be everywhere ........"

  • So I would also advise against WT. The special forces also combine that with other Steelen - they don't just do WT. In addition, the special forces also have special trainers.
    And with WT it is unfortunately the case that, in my opinion, you don't really need a lot of good coaches and they don't save enough.
    Training should also build up your mental state, it should be fun and bring success.
    I think that a combination of Thai boxing and Brazilian Jiu Jitzu is very good.
    Thai boxing is one of the toughest martial arts in the world. Therefore very good to get fit to work out and to go to your limits. Jiu Jitzu has good leverage techniques.
    The WT also had good techniques, but with them you only come against nerds, or against someone who has little experience in martial arts.
    So I think if you take the time to train, because that is also the case with the tough guys.

  • It doesn't matter which martial arts you practice because style is not a fight against style. It depends on the fighter.

  • Hmmm I don't entirely agree with you. Of course it also depends on the fighter, but steel also plays a role. Let's compare, for example, Wingchun with boxing .... If the two of them train 3 times a week, say, about 1.5 hours, then the boxer had it Almost certainly much better chances because the work is simply much more intense ... Much more effective stamina and sparring. Whereby hardly any sparring is done with the WT and everything is focused on the technology, technology alone does not bring anything.
    I trained both and have now decided on the mma. Because I think that's really the most effective and it's just a lot of fun.

  • Hmmm I don't entirely agree with you. Of course, it also depends on the fighter, but the steel plays a role. Let's compare Wingchun with boxing, for example .... If the two of them train 3 times a week, say, about 1.5 hours, then the boxer had it Almost certainly much better chances because the work is simply much more intense ... Much more effective stamina and sparring. Whereby hardly any sparring is done with the WT and everything is focused on the technology, technology alone does not bring anything.
    I trained both and have now decided on the mma. Because I think that's really the most effective and it's just a lot of fun.

    Then you just went to a bad WT school. Are there just like bad boxing schools, and? Sparring is a martial art that is a fact. What you shouldn't forget, boxing is a sport and I don't know of any sport-oriented boxing school that incorporates the legal SV aspect. How do I stand in front of others who are about to get a knack? That and more is taught (at least in my school). Your initial question also relates to the use in the security industry, what do you think it looks like to shoot someone's head out of the classic boxing position? You strike and the opponent falls uncontrollably to the ground and slaps the back of the head on the asphalt. What did you win then ...? Or in MMA when you are in the mount position and let your fists pound on him ...? Of course, there are also great levers in MMA. But they also make you very vulnerable because you usually lie down on the floor. I get the drop in the WT so that the attacker is lying on his stomach as much as possible, that I can put handcuffs on if necessary or that I can loosen up if the environment makes it necessary.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't deny any art the effectiveness, that is without a doubt. But boxing and MMA are sports, the training takes place on soft ground and you only have one opponent. In a real SV situation you don't have that, when it hits the ground you roll around on hard ground. Sometimes a "911" can come to rest from the side. I'm not saying that you as a WT'ler or Kravmag'ler are immune to it, but that - in contrast to sport - you train.

    I also only do WT because it is very available in my area (8x a week) and I can afford it. Another martial art with the conditions and I would train there, I'm not a "WT-is-the-best-everything-else-is-nothing" type.