What movies have realistic shootouts fight scenes

HOLLYWOOD: The 3 Most Realistic Gun Battles

It's no secret that movies are often wrong when it comes to portraying firearms and the way they are used in a fight. From the protagonists of the 80s who refuse to shoulder their guns while shooting, to the seemingly infinite magazine capacity in every hero's gun, filmmakers have long been putting what looks cool above what is actually possible in reality would. And to be honest, it's hard to be mad at them for that. After all, firing two pistols sideways looks pretty badass, even if it's the dumbest thing anyone can do in a firefight.

There are, of course, exceptions to the rule when it comes to Hollywood's depictions of firefights - films that manage to provide a realistic representation of how armed conflict actually unfolds while still offering something for the audience to enjoy. These films may not be realistic from start to finish, but each features at least one firefight realistic enough to get even highly skilled fighters to move toward the edges of their seats.

1. Delta's big appearance: "Sicario"

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The border scene in the 2015 film “Sicario” is worth looking at from several angles: As a prime example of filmmaking, this scene does an enormous amount of work when it comes to building tension. And even if some elements of the framework are not entirely realistic, the way in which the subsequent firefight takes place offers a concise and brutal glimpse into the abilities of those men who find their way into an elite team like that of the Delta Force .

In contrast to the past Chuck Norris depictions of the deltas, these men are silent and active and they use their skills not only to neutralize their opponents, but to keep the situation as limited as possible. The extremely successful build-up of tension and the lightning-fast resolution of the situation leave the viewer with the same feeling of stress after the end of the battle that anyone who has ever been in a real fight should be familiar with. Even if the deltas themselves seem pretty unimpressed. As real SF soldiers will often confirm, it's less about being unfazed and more about getting the job done - but it looks pretty much the same to the rest of us dull mortals.

2. The gold standard: "Saving Private Ryan"

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When "Saving Private Ryan" premiered in 1998, I clearly remember my parents returning home early from their long-planned date. My father, a Vietnam veteran who had long struggled with certain aspects of his ministry, was looking forward to Steven Spielberg's new war epic. However, he found the opening scene, which depicts the brutal reality of the invasion of Normandy in World War II, too realistic to see through. My father, who never spoke of his working hours, decided to leave the cinema and spent the rest of the evening in his room in silence.

In spirit, this list is a song of praise to realism in cinema. But that realism has a price. And sometimes that price can be too high. A number of veterans have shared my father's views on the film (he saw it himself at home, after all) and called this opening sequence, often referred to as a filmmaking masterpiece, one of the most difficult scenes they have ever seen.

3. Val Kilmer helps train Green Berets: “Heat”

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The dramatic ten-minute shootout in "Heat" has become legendary in Hollywood for good reason. For six weeks, the film's production team locked down parts of downtown Los Angeles every Saturday and Sunday to turn the city into a war zone. The actors were ready to do their part. The producers hired real British SAS soldiers to train the actors in real combat tactics at the L.A. County Sheriff's nearby rifle ranges.

Legend has it that Val Kilmer did the training so well that the footage of him firing in multiple directions and reloading his weapon (without a cut) was shown at Fort Bragg as part of training for the American Green Berets. Definitely, in the training of Marines at the MCRD San ​​Diego, they are shown to recruits as an example of effective retreat under fire.